Stories

By Gregory Kempers Few things beat spending the afternoon out in the mountains, and sharing that time with your pup is one of those things! But not all natural areas are dog-friendly and those that are often have restrictions. It’s up to us as owners and hikers to know the rules and follow them. All rules are subject to change, and if we don’t do our part, someday in the future we might not be
By Michael Polletta   Stop searching for comfort and security “Isn’t that what that guy in Utah was doing when he had to cut his arm off?” my coworker asked after I explained what I did during our four days off. My coworkers and I had recently watched the movie 127 Hours, which recounts Aron Ralston’s hair-raising nightmare in Bluejohn Canyon near the Horseshoe Canyon section of Canyonlands National Park. Ralston’s arm got pinned by
By Kevin DeVries When it comes to the outdoors, superlatives sell. So-and-so is the best skier in the world. This particular sleeping pad is the lightest thing on the market. The Pacific Crest Trail is the most scenic thru-hike out there. White Pine Lake, in the Wasatch range of northern Utah, doesn’t fit any of those superlatives. It’s not particularly long or hard. To be sure, it’s absolutely beautiful, but not quite as iconic as
Words by Eva Glasrud, Photos by Justin Smith Ridiculous things happen at Half Dome. The very first time I did this 20-ish mile hike — all uphill one way, all downhill the other, with a glorious flat-ish spot in the middle — I was brand new to California. I’d been here maybe three days, and my crew coach brought the team out to do the hike. Timed. So… that was pretty ridiculous. Another ridiculous thing
By Amber McDaniel “How’s your highball head?” I had been bubbling about my excitement for our upcoming trip to Bishop to a seasoned climber buddy when he broke my excitement with a question I didn’t know how to answer.  After all, I’d never climbed higher (unroped, that is) than 12 feet off the ground. I did know I was a heady climber, afraid of committing moves and low percentage success rates.  I had the grip
By Gregory Kempers As a kid who grew up in the midwest, I’d only skied for a single season for a club at school. I was pretty good at it then. When I moved here to Colorado, just a few miles away from Monarch Mountain, I knew I wanted to hit the slopes as much as I possibly could. The only issue is that nature guides don’t make a whole lot of cash, and there

January 14, 2019

The Great Outdoors

By Michael Polletta What is it that makes it so great? I walked down the trail with my hand out to give him a high five. He reached out and slapped my hand, and we were both smiling from ear to ear. I had just spent several minutes watching this little boy log rolling himself down the snow covered trail as I was finishing my hike to Lake Haiyaha in Rocky Mountain National Park. His
By Greg Kempers I love coffee shops. I also love being in the middle of nowhere. Unfortunately, coffee shops aren’t typically found above treeline, so here are a few ideas on how to bring the coffee shop to you! All of the latte recipes listed below have powdered milk (I like the full fat kind, found in most grocery stores under the brand Nido) in them. Not only does this make transport of the ingredients
By Gregory Kempers Whether you’re a seasonal worker like me and want some solo hiking time on the shoulder season or are on an epic road trip, you’ll run into similar issues and situations when first figuring out how to be an efficient bum. I currently work as a sled dog guide in Alaska or Colorado, depending on the time of year, so my line of work requires a tremendous amount of driving and camping.
By Dillon Upp It seems like every millennial pines for the life on 4 wheels. They say freedom is the road. Jack Kerouac says, “Our battered suitcases were piled on the sidewalk again; we had longer ways to go. But no matter, the road is life.” But is the road life? I’ve been on the road since December 21st, 2017. It has been almost a year and I have gained so much experience from diving
Words and Photos by Michael Polletta How one man’s story lead me on a chilling four mile hike in Yellowstone’s Pelican Valley Reality sets in when you start a hike with bear spray in one hand. That reality is the realization that you are heading into a landscape that is more wild than anything else in the lower 48 states. A landscape that is one of the last few homes to some of the most
By Eva Glasrud Gentle granite slopes. Deep blue mountain lakes. No roads for miles… yet a charming group of lakeside cabins. Welcome to Lower Echo Lake, an El Dorado paradise I only discovered this summer… because of Rimadyl. For those whose doggie companions haven’t reached that age yet, Rimadyl is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that treats arthritis. My 13-year-old Australian shepherd mix, Ruby, had developed a limp in her back left leg that spring.